Understand the Australian Curriculum: Digital Technologies

Australian Digital Technologies Curriculum:

Data collection

Numerical, categorical, or structured values collected or calculated to create information, e.g. the Census.

Data collection
F-2 Unpack > 3-4 Unpack > 5-6 Unpack > 7-8 Unpack > 9-10 Unpack >

F-2

Collect, explore and sort data, and use digital systems to present the data creatively (ACTDIP003)

3-4

Collect, access and present different types of data using simple software to create information and solve problems (ACTDIP009)

5-6

Acquire, store and validate different types of data, and use a range of software to interpret and visualise data to create information (ACTDIP016)

7-8

Acquire data from a range of sources and evaluate authenticity, accuracy and timeliness (ACTDIP025)

9-10

Develop techniques for acquiring, storing and validating quantitative and qualitative data from a range of sources, considering privacy and security requirements (ACTDIP036)

Acquire data

Acquire data examines how we collect and access data from a variety of sources.

F-2

Collect data

Gather and record data by counting and measuring.

Students gather data by observing, counting, and measuring objects in their school and home environments (e.g. recording the pets at home and counting them by type).

3-4

Collect data

Gather and record data by counting and measuring.

Students collect different types of data in different ways (e.g. tallying to record the number of cars that drive past the school; measuring the growth of school plants).

Access data

Obtain existing data from an online data source.

Students access data from a file, website or online database as directed by the teacher (e.g. the list of convicts aboard the Charlotte in the First Fleet).

5-6

Acquire data

Generate or obtain data from existing or potential data sources.

Students can generate data of various types through their own experiments and investigations.

Store Data

Record data in a format that allows it to be easily accessed or obtained.

Students can describe how the data they have acquired can be stored in different ways using different representations and/or software, and select the most suitable representation is important.

7-8

Acquire data

Generate or obtain data from existing or potential data sources.

Students can generate data of various types through their own experiments and investigations, using a range of sources.

9-10

Acquire data

Generate or obtain data from existing or potential data sources.

Students can describe the differences between qualitative (descriptive) and quantitative (measurable) data, and how that informs the method(s) used to collect it.

Store Data

Record data in a format that allows it to be easily accessed or obtained.

Students can explain how data can be stored in different ways, and that each approach has advantages and disadvantages. The best way to store data is often dependent on the problem being solved or the method it will be processed/interpreted.

Manage data

Manage data is concerned with the processes we use to facilitate how we use data.

F-2

The content descriptions do not explicitly address Manage data in band F-2.

3-4

The content descriptions do not explicitly address Manage data in band 3-4.

5-6

Validate Data

Ensuring data is "clean" - i.e. correct and useful to the problem being solved.

Students can determine, after collecting the data, whether it is correct (e.g. did people answer questions properly) and how well it addresses the problem they were attempting to solve.

7-8

Evaluate Data

Ensuring data is not only correct, but from a reliable source and relevant/current for the problem being solved.

Students can explain why the source of the data and the method used to acquire it is important - that data from unreliable or out-of-date sources should not be used for making conclusions or determining action.

9-10

Validate Data

Ensuring data is "clean" - i.e. correct and useful to the problem being solved.

Students can analyse the correctness of the data, how it addresses the problem, and the validity of sources used. They understand the concept of bias in data, and how this can lead to skewed interpretation of results.

Data Privacy Requirements

Using data must not infringe upon the privacy of the user(s) the data pertains to.

Students can make judgements about whether data being collected is necessary to solve the problem, and if having that data exposes them to potential legal or ethical issues if it is misused or inadvertently exposed e.g. do you really need to know a person's income for your application?

Data Security Requirements

The storage and collection of data should abide by best practice security techniques.

Students can identify why the methods you use to store and collect data should be secure, protecting that data from potential risks. This includes things like transferring data only using encrypted channels, or not storing passwords or sensitive information in cleartext in databases.