Understand the Australian Curriculum: Digital Technologies

Australian Digital Technologies Curriculum:

Digital systems

A system that processes data in binary, made up of hardware, controlled by software, and connected to form networks.

Digital systems
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F-2

Recognise and explore digital systems (hardware and software components) for a purpose (ACTDIK001)

3-4

Identify and explore a range of digital systems with peripheral devices for different purposes, and transmit different types of data (ACTDIK007)

5-6

Examine the main components of common digital systems and how they may connect together to form networks to transmit data (ACTDIK014)

7-8

Investigate how data is transmitted and secured in wired, wireless and mobile networks, and how the specifications affect performance (ACTDIK023)

9-10

Investigate the role of hardware and software in managing, controlling and securing the movement of and access to data in networked digital systems (ACTDIK034)

Systems

Systems explores the composition of systems and their use in all aspects of our lives.

F-2

Recognise digital systems

Recognise and name digital systems.

Students name digital systems (e.g. smart phone or laptop) that they interact with at home and school, and recognise that they are digital systems.

Explore digital systems with purpose

Play with and use digital systems in meaningful ways.

Students play (with guidance) and use different systems to explore what they do and how they work. They match digital systems to specific purposes (e.g. using a phone to call a family member).

3-4

Explore digital systems with purpose

Use digital systems in multiple ways.

Students use systems differently depending on the demands of the task, and learn that many systems can perform multiple tasks (e.g. a tablet can take photos, record sound, find information, etc.).

Peripherals and components

Components are the parts included in a digital system. Peripherals connect to a digital system to extend its functionality.

Students understand that external devices can be connected to digital systems to expand their functionality (e.g. a USB drive adds portable storage; a laptop can only print when connected to a printer).

5-6

Peripherals and components

Components are the parts included in a digital system. Peripherals connect to a digital system to extend its functionality.

Students explain how digital systems are made up of parts (e.g. a tablet includes a screen, battery, processor etc.) that perform specific functions (e.g. the processor controls the tablet, performs calculations, and manipulates data).

7-8

Hardware specifications

Select hardware with appropriate specifications to perform particular tasks.

Students explain how hardware specifications affect performance (e.g. how different bandwidth networks affect download speed) and select appropriate hardware for particular tasks (e.g. choosing a powerful graphics card for computer gaming).

9-10

Operating systems

Software that manages the hardware and software resources of a digital system.

Students explain how the operating system hides the complexity of different hardware from applications (e.g. applications can treat input from a mouse and touchscreen in the same way).

Networks

Networks describes how we connect systems together and use them to transmit data.

F-2

The content descriptions do not explicitly address Networks in band F-2.

3-4

Transmit data

Send and receive data to and from digital systems.

Students understand that different types of data can be transferred between digital systems (e.g. streaming music from an online service to your computer, using a smartphone to video call a friend).

5-6

Connecting digital systems

Different systems can be connected to one another to exchange information.

Students explain how separate systems can be connected in different ways (e.g. cables or wireless) to exchange data (e.g. connecting a computer to an online gaming server).

Transmit data

Send and receive data to and from digital systems.

Students describe the way data is structured (e.g. broken up into small pieces) and transmitted through a network (e.g. passes from the source, through multiple devices, to the destination).

7-8

Connecting digital systems

Different systems can be connected to one another to exchange information.

Students describe physical networks (e.g. wired, wireless and mobile) and compare their properties (e.g. bandwidth, latency, reliability, etc.).

Transmit data

Send and receive data to and from digital systems.

Students explain how problems occur in network communication (e.g. routers can drop packets) and how they can be solved (e.g. TCP uses acknowledgements to confirm packets have been received).

9-10

Connecting digital systems

Different systems can be connected to one another to exchange information.

Students configure a simple network using real or simulated hardware (e.g. switches, routers, and networked devices) and observe packets moving around the network.

Transmit data

Send and receive data to and from digital systems.

Students explain how domain names and IP addresses (e.g. DNS and routing tables) allow data to be transmitted to specific networked devices.

Security

Security is concerned with how we protect the data stored in and transmitted by systems.

F-2

The content descriptions do not explicitly address Security in band F-2.

3-4

The content descriptions do not explicitly address Security in band 3-4.

5-6

The content descriptions do not explicitly address Security in band 5-6.

7-8

Cryptography

Cryptography allows a message to be securely stored and transmitted.

Students explain why cryptography is necessary for securing data (e.g. transmitting credit card details over the web) and explore simple encryption and decryption algorithms (e.g. rot13 and XOR).

9-10

Cryptography

Cryptography allows a message to be securely stored and transmitted.

Students explore how public key cryptography (e.g. TLS) and hashing (e.g. SHA-1) secure the storage and transmission of data.

Access control

Restricting access to hardware, software and/or data for authorised users only.

Students describe elements of access control (e.g. authentication, permissions, etc.) and explain why they are necessary (e.g. restricting access to install software to administrators).