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Understand the Australian Curriculum: Digital Technologies

Australian Digital Technologies Curriculum:

Specification

Defining a problem precisely and clearly, identifying the requirements, and breaking it down into manageable pieces.

Specification
F-2 Unpack > 3-4 Unpack > 5-6 Unpack > 7-8 Unpack > 9-10 Unpack >

F-2

Follow, describe and represent a sequence of steps and decisions (algorithms) needed to solve simple problems (ACTDIP004)

3-4

Define simple problems, and describe and follow a sequence of steps and decisions (algorithms) needed to solve them (ACTDIP010)

5-6

Define problems in terms of data and functional requirements drawing on previously solved problems (ACTDIP017)

7-8

Define and decompose real-world problems taking into account functional requirements and economic, environmental, social, technical and usability constraints (ACTDIP027)

9-10

Define and decompose real-world problems precisely, taking into account functional and non-functional requirements and including interviewing stakeholders to identify needs (ACTDIP038)

Problem definition

Problem definition is the process we follow and considerations we make to determine and describe the problems we intend to solve.

F-2

Familiar problems

Simple problems that are already familiar to students.

Students investigate familiar and easily understood problems, with few complications or steps required to solve them (e.g. deciding what to wear depending on the day and weather).

3-4

Familiar problems

Simple problems that are already familiar to students.

Students recognise a range of problems, and can define achievable solutions to their own problems (e.g. buying presents for family members within a budget)

Describe problems

Determining the nature and description of a problem to be solved.

Students answer guiding questions (e.g. which family members need presents? What is the budget?) and then write a problem statement (e.g. I need to buy presents for mum, dad and my sister for less than $30).

5-6

Describe problems

Determining the nature and description of a problem to be solved.

Students use provided stimulus (e.g. newspaper articles, information brochures) to identify a problem and write a problem statement (e.g. people get hurt in bushfires when they are unprepared. How can we help them be better prepared?)

7-8

Describe problems

Determining the nature and description of a problem to be solved.

Students identify problems that have many possible causes and solutions (e.g. how can the health of Australians be improved?)

9-10

Describe problems

Determining the nature and description of a problem to be solved.

Students can describe the problems they are investigating in great detail, taking into account many factors and using precise language. This includes having multiple potential results.

Stakeholder input

Using input from others affected by the problem to gain multiple perspectives on its nature.

Students can draw on input from other people who are either affected by or otherwise have a stake in the issue to determine the parameters of the problem they are solving. This ensures the problem considers perspectives that may differ from their own.

Constraints

Constraints describe the restricting factors we face when solving problems, and how we factor these into our planned solutions.

F-2

The content descriptions do not explicitly address Constraints in band F-2.

3-4

The content descriptions do not explicitly address Constraints in band 3-4.

5-6

Requirements and constraints

What a solution is required to do to solve the problem, and the restrictions on that solution.

Students describe what a solution needs to do to solve a problem (e.g. inform people about the steps they need to take to prepare for a bushfire) and the data available to solve it (e.g. the fire danger rating).

7-8

Requirements and constraints

What a solution is required to do to solve the problem, and the restrictions on that solution.

Students can define problems in terms of their purpose (i.e. what they are trying to solve), and do so taking into account limitations that their solution may face. Limitations may take the form of financial or technology constraints, or may consider things such as the impact any solution may have on the local environment or population.

9-10

Requirements and constraints

What a solution is required to do to solve the problem, and the restrictions on that solution.

Students can define problems in terms of their purpose (i.e. what they are trying to solve), and do so taking into account limitations that their solution may face. Limitations may take the form of financial or technology constraints, or may consider things such as the impact any solution may have on the local environment or population.

Decomposition

Decomposition is the process of breaking a problem into more manageable pieces so it can be understood and solved.

F-2

The content descriptions do not explicitly address Decomposition in band F-2.

3-4

The content descriptions do not explicitly address Decomposition in band 3-4.

5-6

The content descriptions do not explicitly address Decomposition in band 5-6.

7-8

Decompose problems

Breaking a problem down into smaller, simpler parts that can be solved separately.

Students can investigate large enough problems such that solving them requires the students to think about individual elements of the problem that can be solved separately to make the main problem more approachable/solvable.

9-10

Decompose problems

Breaking a problem down into smaller, simpler parts that can be solved separately.

Students can investigate complex problems that require them to think about how they should be broken down to make them more manageable. The smaller problems they do identify can be defined in great detail, and relationships between those problems clearly understood.